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Random Thoughts on Instructional Design

Re-visiting Blooms Digital Taxonomy

About two years ago I posted a series on teaching and learning tools that could be used to design and/or complete learning activities that fell into the learning domains defined by Benjamin Bloom and later revised by Anderson & Krathwohl. Since there have been significant advances in tools and increased understanding and how resources can be used for teaching and learning, I thought that I should post an updated list of resources.

All resources are aligned to six cognitive domains and in some cases you will find resources duplicated across domains due to the multiple student engagement strategies that can be employed with the tool.

While the domains and resources are presented in a linear fashion, the learning process can be initiated at any point; however, the lower taxonomic levels should be encompassed within the scaffolding of the learning task.

Creating

  • Directing and producing – to directing or producing a product, performance or production is a highly creative process. It requires the student to have vision, understand the components and meld these into a coherent product.
    • NowLive – A social network that lets anyone create a live, interactive talk show. Stickam for audio, in some ways.
    • Plotbot – This tool is specifically designed for script writing. You can write a private script or a public one that others can contribute to. This is a very simple to use tool which could be used by a group to produce a script for performance in class.
    • ACMI Generator – great site for digital storytelling and creating a storyboard scene with a script created by the Australian Centre fot the Moving Image.
    • Talkshoe – Create your own live talk show or interactive podcast.
  • Filming, animating, video casting, podcasting, mixing and remixing – these relate to the increasing trend to using and availability of multimedia and multimedia editing tools. Students frequently capture, create, mix and remix content to produce unique products.
    • BlueGrind – Converts text (especially blogs) into podcasts.
    • Feed2Podcast – Convert any RSS feed into a podcast.
    • Gabcast – Record podcasts straight from your phone.
    • Gcast – Record, mix and broadcast your podcasts. You can record messages by phone and upload MP3 files from your computer.
    • Odiogo – convert RSS feeds, text articles and blog posts to podcasts.
    • Storybird – As well as being a tool to write books, it is a place for illustrators to show off their talents. This means you can write your book around a set of pictures supplied by an artist. You could use a variety of pictures to create a unique story or alternative give students the same picture and see how each of them interprets the story differently.
    • Talkr – Convert blogs to audio podcasts.
    • Yodio – Record audio from your phone, add photos and captions.
  • Podcasting or vodcasting can also be used for guided asynchronous debates, and iCam and web meeting tool for debates across distances. Mind mapping tools can be used to define arguments and possible rebuttals. Chat rooms and Instant Messaging (IM) services can be enable synchronous debates across distances. Discussion Boards and email can be used for guided asynchronous debates. Persuasive speeches can be presented across distances with mind map tools used in presentation mode.
    • Dropmind – The product looks very good and has all the usual attachments such as notes, hyperlinks, pictures and icons. The unique feature here is that the mind maps can be shown in a presentation mode.
    • Mindmeister – The free basic account allows 6 mindmaps. You can export the mind map as an image file or include it in a website or blog. You can’t add files to the map in the free version although you can in the paid version which also allows for the maps to be created offline. You can add icons to the map, notes, and web links. Collaborators can be invited by e-mail and quite cleverly they give a different color for each collaborator so you can see who has done all the work. The Map can be published online for viewing but doesn’t allow for editing.
    • Mindomo – The free basic account includes 7 Mindmaps which should be enough for most needs. There is a fairly comprehensive help section. I found the Menu a little tricky at first but very useful once I had spent a few minutes with it. Mindomo allows you to make a colorful map which can include pictures, text, video, audio and links to webpages. It has a small library of symbols so pupils will need to learn to upload own images. Students can publish in a private Folder and share maps by e-mail and control how much the recipient can edit. Alternatively they can publish in the Public Folder allowing anyone who finds the map or is given the web address to edit or view.
    • Sketchcast – In essence you record yourself making a drawing and add a narration to make a short film. It could be used as a tutorial tool or simply as a bit of fun. I thought it might be a good way to explain what a word means, a sort of virtual charades
  • Programming – Whether it is creating their own applications, programming macros or developing games or multimedia applications within structured environments, learners are routinely creating their own programs to suit their needs and goals. Why not harness that creativity and have learners design a functional project that addressed course objectives and outcomes.
    • Iplotz – This is a very specific tool to allow programmers to design a prototype/wireframe of a webpage or software with some functionality. This can then be shared with others and feedback obtained.
  • Publishing – whether via the web or from home computers, publishing in text, media or digital formats are increasing. Again this requires a huge overview of not only the content being published, but the process and product. Related to this concept are also Video blogging – the production of video blogs, blogging and also wiking – creating, adding to and modify content in wikis. Creating or building Mash ups and Digital Storytelling would also fit in this domain.
    • Blinkweb – You do not need to validate your email to begin which can be useful in a class as confirming e-mails before use takes up valuable time. Easy layout and helpful video tutorials. One interesting feature of Blinkweb is the ability to import previous websites into Blinkweb for editing and hosting. I didn’t try the function but if it works as well as the rest of the site then this is something you may want to investigate. It suggested there may be issues with explorer 7 and really I should use Firefox or Google Chrome.
    • Jimdo – There is a wide range of templates to choose from although I found it difficult to visualize what the changes would look like while I was editing. You can fairly easily insert up to date widgets such as Youtube or Slideshows.
    • LiveBinders – Free tool that allows users to curate and share research and resources.
    • my ebook – The tool is very simple to use and creates an excellent finished product. You can either upload content such as scans or pictures etc. or alternatively you can add backgrounds, text etc. direct from the book editor. This tool also allows you to enter video, audio and Flash Animations to your book. Another interesting feature is that you can leave comments when viewing a book.
    • FormatPixl – This is a very professional looking website which produces a quality product. There is a free version but note that the available memory space is only 500k. You can add Youtube videos as well as images to your book. Note there was no apparent way to print out the finished books.
    • Mentormob – cloud-based tool that allows users to create collaborative multimedia learning units.
    • Moonfruit – You can create a website for free and it will be hosted with advertisements for as long as you want. The one condition is that you must visit the site every couple of months to keep it active. Students can collaborate by simply logging in using the same user name and password. Perhaps the one weakness with Moonfruit for some is that it is a bit limited in terms of the widgets you can add.
    • Protagonize – This tool is designed to allow multiple users to write a collaborative book. You can either start your own book or add to someone else’s. This could be used perhaps to write alternative ending to books or as intended to write a work of fiction. I suppose you could also use this tool to write a set of class notes although there are better tools for this. As well as writing the book you have the option to rate and add comments to stories. This means you could also use the tool as a peer assessment tool.
    • Webnode – Simple Log in procedure and very easy to use menu allowed me to create a web site in a few minutes. You can keep it simple or make your site much more interactive with one of the widest range of widgets I have seen on offer.
    • Weebly – Very easy set up and fast intuitive menu helps to build websites very quickly. Not as much flexibility as some, for example, I could only place the image left, right or center, not anywhere as with Moonfruit. On the other hand the upload facility for images was probably one of the simplest I have seen. I also liked the Manage Pages section which was very clear and helpful in putting together the menu. Overall, lacks the sophistication of some of the others but would be very good for publishing a simple website with text, pictures, video etc. The free version comes ad free which makes it useful for course projects.
    • Wix – It was a little slower than some of the tools in this section to load up but this is probably due to the high quality of the tool. There are several flash based tutorials which are clear and very helpful.

Evaluating & Collaborating

  • Blog/vlog commenting and reflecting – Constructive criticism and reflective practice is often facilitated by the use of blogs and video blogs (vlog).
    • Bebo – product allows users to share photos with music, and blogs, and draw on members’ White Boards.
    • Blogger – Google resource that allow the user to set up an unlimited number of hosted blogs for free. The resources is easy to use and has a built in tutorials.
    • Edublogs – free blog hosting service based on WordPress. Site is dedicated to offering blogs for faculty and students. Site contains a number of teaching techniques for integrating blogs into the learning environment, and they offer classroom and campus wide solutions.
    • Google Docs – online word processor, spreadsheet tolls and presentation editor that allows users to collaboratively create and share instantly.
    • Squidoo – allows users to create a free webpage (lens) about his/her interest or passion. The tool can writers in honing their web writing lens by narrowing down and focusing the content being presented.
    • Sync.in – a web-based word processor that allows users to collaborate in real-time.
    • WordPress – the software for this blog tool can be downloaded for free and hosted on your own server or hosting service at http://wordpress.org/, or you can free hosted blog at WordPress.com
    • Writeboard – a sharable cloud-based text editor that retains all edits, an allows edits to be rolled back to previous versions. The tool also allows for the easy comparison of document changes. It can be used by individuals or for group collaboration.
  • Moderating – This is high level evaluation, the moderator must be able to evaluate a posting or comment from a variety of perspectives, assessing its worth, value and appropriateness. Tools that can be used for commenting on, and moderating postings are: discussion boards, forums, blog, wikis, twitter, threaded discussions, bulletin boards, chat rooms.
  • Podcasting – podcasting is a creative process involving several different components. A successful podcast must be planned and scripted. It requires care and preparation to record and construct, and requires learners to plan clear and concise messages using a one way communication mechanism.
  • Posting – posting comments to blogs, discussion boards, threaded discussions. These are increasingly common elements of students’ daily practice. Good postings like good comments are not simple one line answers rather they structured and constructed to evaluate the topic or concept.
  • Testing (Alpha and Beta) – Testing of applications, processes and procedures is a key element in the development of any tool. To be effective testers students must have the ability of analyze the purpose of the tool or process, what its correct function should be and what its current function is.
  • Validating – With the wealth of information available to students combined with the lack of authentication of data, students of today and tomorrow must be able to validate the verity of their information sources. To do this they must be able to analyze and evaluate the data sources and make judgments based on these. Key elements of validating the information is reporting the information source, accessing multiple information sources and information types, creating linkages between the information sources and making decisions on the validity of information based on this process.
  • Wikis – Allows learners to show understanding by developing content via paraphrasing and authoring material on a related topic in a wiki environment. The authoring aspect of this type of tool shows application as the learner edits the wiki to a suitable standard.  Click here to learn more about using wikis in teaching.
  • Collaborating and networking – Collaboration is an increasing feature of education. In a world increasingly focused on communication, collaboration, leading to collective intelligence is a key aspect. Effective collaboration involves evaluating the strengths and abilities of the participants and evaluating the contribution they make. Networking is a feature of collaboration, contacting and communicating with relevant person via a network of associates. Some of the techniques that can be utilized to illicit collaborative networking are: panel discussions, group projects, and social networking.
    • Edmodo – Edmodo is a free and private online social platform for instructors and students to share ideas, files, events and assignment s. The site is accessible online and from any mobile device via free smart phone applications. Built on a micro-blogging model and adapted to be used in education, Edmodo allows instructor s to post messages and notes, discuss class topics, give assignments and grade work, share content and materials, and network and exchange ideas with their colleagues. In addition, they can maintain a class calendar , store and share files, have public (RSS) stream, and conduct polls. Edmodo is built around closed group collaboration, which means only students with a course code can join the groups.
    • Facebook – some of the features available with this tool are: discussion boards, instant messaging, email, set up groups and post pictures, video and audio.
    • Google+ – includes may elements of many different applications integrated together to create an online social networking community that can be control the delivery of information through circles of users.
    • Linkedin – provides a series of professional communities that can assist students in developing networks, portfolios and employment leads. The tool also provided professional discussion groups and current business events news feeds.
    • Ning – web based service that allows users to create their own social networks and participate in other networks. Users can determine the site’s appearance and functionality, as well as whether the site is public or private. Some features provided are: photo and video uploading/linking, member lists, event calendars, forums and blogs.
    • TWIDDLA – tool allows you to “browse websites in a shared, real-time whiteboard, while marking them up, sharing files and chatting.”
    • Twitter – micro-blogging tool that allows users to publish brief text message of between 140-200 characters.
    • VYEW – a browser-based collaboration and conferencing platform that allows users to collaboratively upload and annotate files, take screen captures of their desktop and draw with whiteboard tools.

Analyzing

  • Cracking – cracking requires the cracker to understand and operate the application or system being cracked, analyze its strengths and weaknesses and then exploit the findings.
  • Linking – this is establishing and building links within and outside of documents and web pages.
    • Diigo – Free research collaboration and social content sharing tool. The product allows you to easily share findings, complete with your highlights and virtual sticky notes. Users can join community interest groups that have tagged and annotated web resources or create their own groups.
    • Zotero – Free browser-embedded tool to help you collect, organize, site and share project/research resources.
  • Mashing – mashups are the integration of several data sources into a single resource. Mashing data currently is a complex process but as more options and sites evolve this will become an increasingly easy and accessible means of analysis. An example of a mashing is the use of cartographic data from Google Maps to add location information to real-estate data, thereby creating a new and distinct web service that was not originally provided by either source.
    • Capzles – The timeline artifact uploader works quickly and is straightforward to use. In this tool the actual day and year had to be exact or it would not save with the entered date but rather the default date of creation. So for example, if you enter Tue 4th 2010 and Tuesday was actually the third, then it will not save. Of course if you are a stickler for detail then this may well be a positive. The easiest way to get the correct day is to type the year into the box rather than scroll and then click on the date in the calendar. Once events are entered they will automatically be put in order. Video, audio and text are easily attached to the timeline.
    • Dipity – While the Dipity timeline maker has limitations such as not being able to go BC, it does allow you to add pictures, video and text to your timeline. What really makes it stand out from the crowd is that if you give your timeline points a geographical tag it will automatically produce a google map of all your key points. So, for example, if you collected the points in a person’s life you could also see their geographical journey.
    • TimeRime – Your e-mail address needs to be authenticated to begin using this tool. There is a BC function by using minus numbers (-500) You can add additional text, links, pictures and video which appear beneath the Timeline. You can add a general period which appears at the bottom of the timeline.
    • Timetoast – You must validate your e-mail before beginning. It has a very simple interface which allows you to add an event which includes a small description, a picture and a link. You must use the exact date and the timeline automatically puts the events in order. The finished timeline is a crisp, clear timeline. You can share the timeline with others although it cannot be edited without using the original password. There is a comment box for viewers to leave feedback. Multiple timelines can be made although they must be viewed separately.
    • XTimeline – You can start building the timeline without password validation. When creating the timeline you set the editing permissions. You can have a public timeline that anyone can edit or a private one where editors must be invited. You do not need to add a complete date, year and month are sufficient. (If you don’t add the month it automatically becomes a 0 on the timeline)There is also the ability to show an event over a period of time by adding an end time. There is also an option to go AD/BC which is particularly useful for anyone making a history timeline. Events are added reasonably easily and can include a picture, video and a written description.
  • Reverse-engineering – this is analogous with deconstruction. It is also related to cracking often without the negative implications associated with technique. One way to design this activity is to require learners to develop relationship mind maps: herring or fish bone mind maps, SWOT Analysis, PMI, Venn, or 6 questions.
    • Dropmind – The product looks very good and has all the usual attachments such as notes, hyperlinks, pictures and icons. The unique feature here is that the mind maps can be shown in a presentation mode.
    • Mindmeister – The free basic account allows 6 mindmaps. You can export the mind map as an image file or include it in a website or blog. You can’t add files to the map in the free version although you can in the paid version which also allows for the maps to be created offline. You can add icons to the map, notes, and web links. Collaborators can be invited by e-mail and quite cleverly they give a different color for each collaborator so you can see who has done all the work. The Map can be published online for viewing but doesn’t allow for editing.
    • Mindomo – The free basic account includes 7 Mindmaps which should be enough for most needs. There is a fairly comprehensive help section. I found the Menu a little tricky at first but very useful once I had spent a few minutes with it. Mindomo allows you to make a colorful map which can include pictures, text, video, audio and links to webpages. It has a small library of symbols so pupils will need to learn to upload own images. Students can publish in a private Folder and share maps by e-mail and control how much the recipient can edit. Alternatively they can publish in the Public Folder allowing anyone who finds the map or is given the web address to edit or view.
    • Personal Brain – A free brainstorming and mind mapping tool. The product can be downloaded to your local computer and works on Windows, MAC and Linux machines. Developed for business but could be very useful for organizing project/research data in a none linear fashion.
    • Popplet -popplet is a mindmap/brainstorming tool. Very easy to use and good looking. It also has the option to show your map as a presentation.
    • VUE (Visual Understanding Environments) – Free open-course concept mapping tool developed by Tufts University. The product can be downloaded to your MAC or Windows machine or hosted on your own server. Multimedia, web links, datasets, and narratives can be added to the maps, and played back as a presentation.

Applying

  • Collaborating using electronic tools for sharing, editing and uploading materials. The tools would include products like Elluminate, Adobe Connect, Wimba, and similar products .  Assessment of collaboration activities would be based on the learners ability to use appropriately the tool to facilitate the discussion.
    • Bookglutton – This is a very useful website for educators and takes reading books to a completely new level. In essence the tool allows you read the online book and chat to others who are reading the same book. In addition you can leave comments on the various paragraphs of a book to create a conversation this way. Teachers could annotate books or leave questions for discussion. Currently there are 1159 books on the website which will limit its educational use if the class book you are reading is not listed. However, there is an option to upload your own book in either Word, HTML, RTF or plain text format. This means you could put up student work to peer assess or to show an exemplar answer, or you could put up your own notes for student comment. Depending on the copyright of books you may be using, you could perhaps upload a significant chapter. Increasingly books are being put online in electronic form so you may be able to get a copy elsewhere that you can upload.
    • Panraven – In essence a book editor that includes text, picture, video and audio in your finished product with a wide range of templates to get you started. It has full control over who can view the finished story and they can be shared with individual or groups. As always care should be taken with the social networking options. The finished product can be printed if desired.
    • ReadCloud – This is a book reading tool with fairly powerful annotation and commenting features. It has a selection of books from Project Guttenburg and also allows for you to upload your own material. There is a built in dictionary and encyclopaedia link and all comments etc. appear on a sidebar very similar to Book Glutton above. The tool is currently in invitation beta and has to be downloaded to use. There is also the opportunity to create groups.
    • VYEW – a browser-based collaboration and conferencing platform that allows users to collaboratively upload and annotate files, take screen captures of their desktop and draw with whiteboard tools.
  • Editing – With most media’s, editing is a process or a procedure that the editor Employs Illustration.
    • Animoto – This tool allows the user to create an MTV style music video. The basic version allows for a 30 second video, but if you register for a free educational account then your students can create a 1 minute video which can also be downloaded for use in class. In essence you put in your photos, add a piece of music (upload your own or use one of the samples) and the program does the rest. You have no control over transitions etc. which on the positive side keeps the focus on the choice of music and photos.
    • Viddix – With this tool you get two panels on your screen. The first displays a video, the second displays text, pictures, links, videos, polls and other things you may want to include. For example, you can pause the video panel and click on a live link in the other panel to explore what the person was talking about. You can then restart the video and it will move the slides in the other panel from where you had originally left off. You also have the possibility of moving backwards and forwards. There are many uses to this tool. Students (or even instructors) could create a lesson about a topic or concept they like. In one panel they could have a video of them explaining it, in the other panel the resources they collected to illustrate.
    • Voicethread – Has a straight-forward logging in process that doesn’t require e-mail validation before use. There are a series of flash based tutorials which are very useful for learning the product. You can add pictures or video to your Voicethread and then record a voice narration or add a text comment. The Video Doodle tool allows you to annotate and highlight sections of the slide to highlight them for your audience. This Doodle tool could be used for a peer assessment task where students could comment on pictures, video or documents that other students have produced. Alternatively, students could produce their own presentation about a topic or create a tutorial to explain a topic or concept to others.
    • Vuvox – There are 3 main tools offered through out this product. The first is a Panorama Collage tool that allows you to create a collage of several different photos and include hotspots which link to media, text and other sites. The second tool is vuvox studio. This is available in two formats either a fully customizable version or a quicker express version and is a more traditional slideshow maker incorporating video and images.
    • Vcasmo – Similar to Viddix above. This enables you to create a presentation which synchronizes video with a second window that includes pictures, text , links etc.
  • Hacking – hacking in its simpler forms is applying a simple set of rules to achieve a goal or objective.
    • Alice 2.0 – free scripting and prototyping environment program for 3D object behavior. (Windows, MAC and Linux)
    • Scratch – programming language created by MIT that makes it easy to create interactive stories, animations, games, music and art.
  • Playing – The increasing emergence of games as a mode of education leads to the inclusion of this term in the list. Students who successfully play or operate a game are showing understanding of process and task and application of skills.
    • Ahead – This is a little bit like Prezi as it allows zooming and panning of the presentation. However, it does have a different feel. I am not sure if the presentation can be downloaded so you may want to look at this before spending too much time making a presentation.
    • educaplay – a nice tool for creating interactive multimedia educational activities.
    • GoAnimate – online animation tool that allows users to create comic based movies that they can share with social networks, and embed into blog, wikis, and web pages.
    • Prezi – is a cloud-based presentation that provides a mobile interface. The zoomable canvas allows the user to create non-linear multimedia presentations.
    • Qlipboard – This tool allows you to make narrated slideshows of either pictures or screenshots. There is also a drawing tool which allows you to annotate the pictures in your presentation. You could use it in many ways, to explain a routine in an experiment, or how students solved a problem, to simple commenting on a set of pictures. The tool can be used on-line or downloaded and is available in a free and paid version.
  • Running and operating – the action of initiating a program. This is operating and manipulating hardware and applications to obtain a basic goal or objective.
  • Uploading and Sharing – uploading materials to websites and the sharing of materials via sites like flickr, Yahoo Groups, Google Groups, etc. This is a simple form of collaboration, a higher order thinking skill. Tools like: word processors,  mind mapper, podcast, vodcast, Audacity, digital recorder, and Skype can be used for interviews then uploaded to a project site.
    • Mixedink – A collaborative writing tool. Students can create a topic and then anyone can edit the text to create a final document. There is also a rating function to vote on their favorite piece of writing. One interesting use is demonstrated in the example below. Rather than using to edit a final document, each student has created their own version. These ‘ideas’ can then be used by everyone in order to produce a piece of writing. This might be useful for gathering evidence for an evaluative essay.

Understanding

  • Advanced and Boolean Searching – This is a progression from the Remembering domain. Students require a greater depth of understanding to be able to create, modify and refine searches to suit their search needs. This type of search requires an understanding of the keywords, Boolean logic, advanced search features, structuring and refining searches and suitable search engine.
  • Blog Journaling – One of the simplest uses for a blog is where a learner simply “talks” “writes” or “types” a daily or task specific journal. This type of assignment can show a basic understanding of content. Blogs can also develop higher level thinking skills when used for discussion and collaboration.
    • Bebo – product allows users to share photos with music, and blogs, and draw on members’ White Boards.
    • Blogger – Google resource that allow the user to set up an unlimited number of hosted blogs for free. The resources is easy to use and has a built in tutorials.
    • Edublogs – free blog hosting service based on WordPress. Site is dedicated to offering blogs for faculty and students. Site contains a number of teaching techniques for integrating blogs into the learning environment, and they offer classroom and campus wide solutions.
    • WordPress – the software for this blog tool can be downloaded for free and hosted on your own server or hosting service at http://wordpress.org/, or you can free hosted blog at WordPress.com
  • Categorizing & Tagging – digital classification – organizing and classify files, web sites and materials using folders, using Del.ico.us and other similar tools beyond simple bookmarking. This can be organizing, structuring and attributing online data, meta-tagging web pages etc. The assumption is that students must be able understand the content of the pages to be able to tag and categorize it properly.
    • Diigo – Free research collaboration and social content sharing tool. The product allows you to easily share findings, complete with your highlights and virtual sticky notes. Users can join community interest groups that have tagged and annotated web resources or create their own groups.
    • Zotero – Free browser-embedded tool to help you collect, organize, site and share project/research resources.
  • Subscribing – Subscription takes bookmarking in its various forms and simple reading one level further. The act of subscription by itself does not show or develop understanding but often the process of reading and revisiting the subscribe feeds leads to greater understanding.
    • Bloglines – A web-based personal news aggregator that allows learners to subscribe to blogs, email groups, and websites then publish the resources that they collect on their own blogs.
  • Tagging, commenting and annotating – a variety of tools exist that allow learners to comment and annotate on web pages, pdf files and other documents. Learners will develop understanding by simply commenting on the pages. This type of activity is analogous with writing notes on hand outs, but is potentially more powerful as they can link and index these.
    • Grockit Answers – allows the user to create Q&A sessions associated with YouTube videos.
    • Primarywall – a web-based sticky note tool designed to allow instructors and students to work together in real time. The tool can be used to gather ideas, collaborate on exploring concept and quickly post information using a computer or mobile device.
    • TWIDDLA – tool allows you to “browse websites in a shared, real-time whiteboard, while marking them up, sharing files and chatting.”
    • VYEW – a browser-based collaboration and conferencing platform that allows users to collaboratively upload and annotate files, take screen captures of their desktop and draw with whiteboard tools.
    • Wallwisher – a collaborative tool that lets students post their thoughts on a common topic using virtual sticky notes that can incorporate images, audio and video links. The tool can also be used for note-taking, to-do lists and for feedback.

Remembering

  • Bullet pointing – This is analogous with listing but in a digital format.
  • Bookmarking or favorating – this is where the students mark for later use web sites, resources and files. Students can then organize these.
  • Highlighting – This is a key element of most productivity suites, encouraging students to pick out and highlight key words and phrases is a techniques for recall.
    • Diigo web highlighter and sticky notes.
  • Searching – Search engines are now key elements of students’ research. At its simplest student are just entering a key word or phrase into the basic entry pane of the search engine.
    • Keotag – Keotag’s initial face looks quite simple, with font sizes large enough to read very comfortably on the screen. Type in a keyword or phrase and a line of favicons appear for Google, Technorati, and Bloglines, as well as over a dozen social bookmarking and community news sites. At far left is a Technorati chart showing the number of blog posts containing the key phrase over the past 30 days. Clicking on a particular favicon reveals result headlines for that source, which can be subscribed to through the resulting RSS feed.
    • KwMap – touts itself as “a keyword map for the whole Internet”. Type in a keyword or phrase, and an unusual interface appears. At right is an alphabetical list of related key phrases. At left is a visual component showing two axes that resemble an insect’s antennae, dotted with nodes representing related terms. Clicking on a term’s node takes you to another layer of loosely-related terms. This is a new search paradigm, but it offers the opportunity to explore related concepts in small leaps. Thus, a search for the word “tree” could lead you to “tea tree oil” or to a study of ancestor worship (via “family tree”). Hyper linking mimics hyper-thought.
    • Mnemomap uses multiple components to display search results. Topmost is a hierarchical graph with nodes branching off the search term. Non-clickable secondary nodes are “Token”, “Tags”, “Translations” and “Synonyms”. Tertiary nodes are search results and can have either a tight relationship to the original search term or a tenuous relationship. Clicking on a tertiary node either adds it to a bar below for a refined search, or produces a new graph, depending on where you click. Below is a section displaying relevant results from Mnemo, Yahoo, flickr, and YouTube. Mnemomap, currently in Alpha 0.2, is a fascinating paradigm for searching, but more suited to power researchers than to the average search engine user.
    • Quintura, who recently received funding, presents text or image search results in a minimalist but graphic form resembling a free form tag cloud. Holding your mouse cursor long enough over a term in the cloud causes new, related terms to appear in the vicinity of the cursor. While the no click interface is a bit disconcerting at first, you can start over by holding the cursor over the original search term, displayed in red text. Any term in focus (hovered over) generates search results in a scrollable panel below.
  • Social networking – this is where people develop networks of friends and associates. It forges and creates links between different people. Like social bookmarks (see below) a social network can form a key element of collaborating and networking.
    • Cell phones, iPads/iPods and instant messaging tools for small action research projects
    • Omgili is a discussion-based engine. In addition to standard search results, a list of links to members is provided who have answered questions relating to a given search term. You can also ask a question, which another member might answer for you with relevant links. Recommendation engines such as omgili have their value in end applications, possibly those similar to the music recommendation site iLike (not to be confused with shopping engine, like).
  • Social bookmarking – this is an online version of local bookmarking or favorites, It is more advanced because you can draw on others bookmarks and tags. While higher order thinking skills like, collaborating and sharing, can and do make use of these skills, this is its simplest form – a simple list of sites saved to an online format rather than locally to the machine.
    • Primarywall – a web-based sticky note tool designed to allow instructors and students to work together in real time. The tool can be used to gather ideas, collaborate on exploring concept and quickly post information using a computer or mobile device.
    • Wallwisher – a collaborative tool that lets students post their thoughts on a common topic using virtual sticky notes that can incorporate images, audio and video links. The tool can also be used for note-taking, to-do lists and for feedback.
    • Also tools like Facebook, MySpace, Digg and Bebo

One comment on “Re-visiting Blooms Digital Taxonomy

  1. Truman Folger
    May 1, 2012

    Major thanks for the post.Thanks Again. Really Cool.

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This entry was posted on April 5, 2012 by in Instructional Technology, Tools.

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